ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND (Rules for writers rounds)

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

"MAB'S MUSINGS" 

AND IT GOES ROUND AND ROUND AND ROUND 
THE ETIQUETTE on songwriter’s rounds." 

Over the past 20 years or so, we have seen more and more of the "Nashville style" songwriter rounds when it comes to songwriter shows. This typically is three-four writer/artists on stage at the same time, each playing one song at a time, going "AROUND" until 3, 4, or five "rounds" have been completed. Started at the BLUEBIRD in the 90's, it was a way to showcase multiple artists, have them do harmonies, lend instrumentation, and present songs in a listening room environment. It is now the standard for songwriter venues. Brings more people in and helps people get comfortable representing (performing) their songs, without the pressure of a solo performance. It can be a LOT of fun, but there are some rules of etiquette to follow so you make a good first impression and make strong musical friends. 

Here are a few strong suggestions to make your round the best it can be: 

#1 CHECK IN WITH THE HOST AT LEAST 30 MINUTES BEFORE YOU ARE SCHEDULED TO PLAY 
Make sure the host, or whoever booked you as part of their round, as well as your team members, and LET THEM KNOW YOU ARE THERE. Don't just expect them to know and wait till two minutes before you go onstage. Remember, it is an honor to be asked to perform and invited to play in a round. BE AWARE OF OTHER PEOPLE! 

#2 YOU ARE PART OF A SHOW 
We all want to put our best foot forward. You have to watch your TIME on songs, including too much time talking (don’t give a 10 minute intro for a 3 minute song). You have a strict time limit and the extra time you spend talking is cutting into someone else's time (and yours). Also you might be setting the NEXT rounds behind time. TIME YOUR SONGS!!!! Know when you are up. 

#3 BE IN TUNE BEFORE YOU GO ON 
Make sure you tune up and know your time slot! You don’t want to be the one that the host has to keep announcing to get on stage. If you have special equipment (e.g. keyboards, pedals, charts, extra players) GET ON FIRST and BE SET UP! Have everything unpacked, in tune and ready to go. Set up time cuts into your round time. You don’t get extra time to set up. 

#4 PERFORMING ORDER 
This is a REALLY big one. 

Going at the end of the round is a pecking order to be worked up to. If you are the junior writer, newer to the area or invited to join in someone else’s round, you do not go last. You might be nervous about going first, but it isn’t about that. The more senior or hit writers close out the round. The writer who has asked you to play in THEIR round, has the honor of closing out the show. They will also introduce the guests in their rounds. It’s important for you to understand this one so you make a good and respectful impression and continue to be asked to join in on rounds. 

#5. PRACTICE YOUR ONSTAGE BANTER / TALK, TUNING, ETC. 
Rounds typically last between ½ to 1 ½ hours, allowing 3-4 songs each. Time your songs AND your intros. If you talk too long, it cuts into everyone’s time. Your total time per song, which includes set up and the song, should be no more than FIVE MINUTES. Skip instrumental solos (or use sparingly if it is critical to the song), skip long intros and turn-arounds. DON'T BORE US, GET TO THE CHORUS! If you do it right, people will want to hear more and know more about you later. 

During your round, tuning should be done without distracting from the others playing. I recommend and use a INLINE TUNER that allows the guitar to be muted from the system and stay in tune. Be courteous and don’t distract while others are performing in your round. 

#6. DON'T DISTRACT! 
Talking while someone else is performing, tuning too loud, getting drinks, getting up and off stage, are distracting to the overall show. Believe it or not, I have seen someone on a CELL PHONE while a show was going on. DON'T DO THAT!!!! 

EXCESSIVE "NOODLING!!!" Playing guitar or other solos when you really don't know someone else's song, singing BAD HARMONIES, or whatever without being asked can be a big distraction and make you look bad. It also can throw off the tempo for the other performer. Basically, if you don’t know the other songwriter and / or they haven’t asked you to be part of their song, don’t do it. 

#7 ALWAYS BE HUMBLE AND KIND 
If someone is nice enough and believes in you enough to invite you to play in a round, BE NICE! It is truly an honor. Thank them for the opportunity. Because that's just what it is. This is an opportunity test out your material and your abilities with other artists in front of a variety of people. 

#8 PUTTING YOUR OWN ROUND TOGETHER 
Start keeping a list of people you might want to invite to play in your own rounds when you get to that point. This list should include people you’ve played with in other rounds, Co-writers, people you admire, hit writers, artists, etc. 

Don’t be offended if you ask someone and they decline the offer. Sometimes people are not comfortable playing with other people, they have their own group they play with, etc. Also, be aware that some writers have obligations with publishers or other business reasons they won’t play. Be respectful and thank them for considering. 

(MAB TIP!): If you invite your co-writers, and they do songs you are a writer on, you can go from 3 or 4 songs to 5, 6 or more. And if you perform regularly, you can get into harmonies, solos, featuring songs that might be from the opposite gender, duets, etc. 

#9 DON'T GHERM 
Nashville is ground zero for songwriters. You will find yourself surrounded by hit songwriters at some point. It’s also not unusual to find yourself playing in a round with a hit writer at some time. Resist the temptation to “gherm” them. This means to not attach yourself to them by prematurely asking them to write or play in a round…or giving them a CD. It’s best to not put them in an uncomfortable position or embarrass yourself. Again, there may be business / legal reasons they cannot accept certain invitations. It is acceptable to complement them (always welcome) and to offer your business card. 
BE RESPECTFUL! 

#1. ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MATERIAL FRESH 
We can all fall into a rut with our songs and doing them the same way every time and in the same order. If you play out a lot, you’ll start seeing some of the same people out. It’s a critical balance of knowing it is always opening night for someone and introducing new material. You’ll find some songs will be requested, which is a huge complement! Know your songs so you can avoid using lyric sheets and can maintain eye contact with your audience. You can also use this time to try performing your songs a little differently. 

A round can be a great way to get out there. But don't waste it. It is always someone's first time to hear you. 
TRY NOT TO SUCK!!!! 

MAB

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